Wage adjusted labour productivity by NACE Rev. 2

  • Provider: Eurostat
  • Source URL: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/tgm/table.do?pcode=...
  • Catalog: Yearly from 2005 to 2015
  • Localized to: English
  • Tags: , .
  • Description:

    The wage-adjusted labour productivity ratio is an indicator of labour productivity that is derived from structural business statistics. It is defined as value added divided by personnel costs which is subsequently adjusted by the share of paid employees in the total number of persons employed, or more simply, apparent labour productivity divided by average personnel costs (expressed as a ratio in percentage terms). Given that this indicator is based on expenditure for labour input rather than a headcount of labour input, it is more relevant for comparisons across activities (or countries) with very different incidences of part-time employment or self-employment.

  • Dimensions

    • Economical indicator for structural business statistics
      • Wage adjusted labour productivity (Apparent labour productivity by average personnel costs) (%)
      • Wage adjusted labour productivity (Apparent labour productivity by average personnel costs) - percentage
    • Classification of economic activities - NACE Rev.2
      • Accommodation and food service activities
      • Administrative and support service activities
      • Construction
      • Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply
      • Information and communication
      • Manufacturing
      • Mining and quarrying
      • Professional, scientific and technical activities
      • Real estate activities
      • Transportation and storage
      • Water supply; sewerage, waste management and remediation activities
      • Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles
    • Geopolitical entity (reporting)
      • Austria
      • Belgium
      • Bosnia and Herzegovina
      • Bulgaria
      • Croatia
      • Cyprus
      • Czech Republic
      • Denmark
      • Estonia
      • European Union (27 countries)
      • European Union (28 countries)
      • Finland
      • France
      • Germany (until 1990 former territory of the FRG)
      • Greece
      • Hungary
      • Iceland
      • Ireland
      • Italy
      • Latvia
      • Lithuania
      • Luxembourg
      • Malta
      • Netherlands
      • Norway
      • Poland
      • Portugal
      • Romania
      • Slovakia
      • Slovenia
      • Spain
      • Sweden
      • Turkey
      • United Kingdom